Tuesday, July 31, 2012

News at Eleven: Finally, in time for the 1912 Stockholm Games,

he [Baron Pierre de Coubertin] was able to secure a place for the arts. Submissions were solicited in the categories of architecture, music, painting, sculpture and literature, with a caveat--every work had to be somehow inspired by the concept of sport. Some 33 (mostly European) artists submitted works, and a gold medal was awarded in each category. In addition to Winans' chariot, other winners included a modern stadium building plan (architecture), an "Olympic Triumphal March" (music), friezes depicting winter sports (painting) and Ode to Sport (literature).  The baron himself was among the winners. Fearing that the competitions wouldn't draw enough entrants, he penned the winning ode under the pseudonyms George Hohrod and Martin Eschbach, leaving the medal jury unaware of the true author.

from The Smithsonian: When the Olympics Gave Out Medals for Art
then The Atlantic Monthly: Remember When the Olympics Used to Have an Art Competition? No?

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1 comment :

John said...

This article is really worth reading, it has too much details in it and yet it is so simple to understand, Thanks for sharing the picture it has great detail in it and i really appreciate your true artistic work!


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